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New vs Second Hand Pianos


second hand pianos

Comparing New VS Second Hand Pianos

 

Are you debating between new and second hand pianos? Although it’s important for you to learn the advantages and disadvantages of each, there’s a more important and decisive factor: How much are you really going to play it?. Unless money is not a factor for you, then you should make a realistic and not an emotional decision.

Are you, buying a piano based on emotion, or are you really committed to learn it and play it regularly? Whether people buy new or second hand pianos, 9 out of 10 times their pianos end up ignored in their living room or basement. If you’re about to start piano lessons or still at the beginning stage, you should consider a used piano until you’re more certain about your commitment to continue.

New Pianos

You should purchase your new piano from a reputable dealer in your area that can offer you a manufacturer-backed warranty. Ask local piano teachers what piano dealers and brands they recommend. If you take good care of your instrument, it should last you 50 years or more.

Don’t buy a piano based on its fancy appearance; select the one with the best internal mechanism. There are many things to consider when buying a piano such as: action, strings, hammers, sound quality, etc. A piano tuner can evaluate these factors and help you to make an informed decision.

Second Hand Pianos

Used pianos can often offer you a lot more value for your money, provided they’ve been well-maintained. A good quality piano that is 2 or 3 years old is as good as a new one if it’s in good condition. One of my students purchased a 2 year old baby grand piano at a 40% discount from someone who was no longer using it. The first time I saw it, I thought it was a brand new piano.

Don’t buy second hand pianos over 60 years old, unless they’ve been reconditioned and have brand names. Also, avoid buying pianos from schools, churches, and/or public places because they get a heavy use and many times are neglected. If you buy from a private seller, ask if he/she can include tuning and delivery with the purchase.

Whether you decide to buy a new or used piano, you should have it inspected by a professional tuner-technician. The fee for this service is small compared to the risk of paying too much, or ending up with a lemon.

One last option you may want to consider is to rent a piano. Some stores apply the monthly fees to your purchase if you decide to keep the piano later on. Find out what other charges you may incur in either case before making your decision.

Buying new or second hand pianos won’t be a complicated process if you do some research and get the necessary advice to ensure you end up with a quality instrument that you’ll enjoy for many years.